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Posts for category: Pediatric Health Care

By Amherst Pediatrics
July 17, 2017
Tags: Germs   Prevention  

Germ PreventionKids pick up germs all day, every day. Whether they are sharing toys, playing at day care or sitting in the classroom, whenever children are together, they are at risk for spreading infectious diseases.

Parents should play an active role in helping their kids stay healthy by taking extra precaution to minimize germs. Here are a few tips on how.

Tidy Up

Spending just a few extra minutes each day tidying up your household can go a long way to keep your home germ-free and your kids healthy. Disinfect kitchen countertops after cooking a meal, and wipe down bathroom surfaces as well—especially if your child has been ill with vomiting or diarrhea. Doorknobs, handrails and many plastic toys should also be sanitized on a routine basis. Simply by disinfecting your home more regularly, and even more so when someone in your household has been ill, you can significantly cut down on re-infection.

Set a Good Example

Parents should set good examples for their children by practicing good hand washing and hygiene at home. Encourage your kids to cough or sneeze into a tissue rather than their hands. Children should also be taught not to share drinking cups, eating utensils or toothbrushes. If your school-aged child does become ill, it’s best to keep them home to minimize spreading the illness to other children in the classroom.

Hand Washing

Finally, one of the easiest (and most effective) ways to prevent the spread of infection is by hand washing. At an early age, encourage your child to wash their hands throughout the day, especially:

  • After using the bathroom
  • Before eating
  • After playing outdoors
  • After touching pets
  • After sneezing or coughing
  • If another member of the household is sick

The Centers for Disease control recommends washing hands for at least 10 to 15 seconds to effectively remove germs.

Parents can’t keep their kids germ-free entirely, but you can take extra precautions to help keep your environment clean. It’s also important to help your child understand the importance of good hygiene and thorough hand washing as a vital way to kill germs and prevent illnesses. 

By contactus@amherstpeds.com
April 24, 2017
Tags: bugs   insects   mosquitos   DEET   bug bites   ticks   Lyme  

As the spring & summer seasons approach, let's review some recommendations about bug bite safety. Most bug bites are harmless; however, insects can expose children to disease and health risks. Ticks can spread Lyme Disease, and mosquitoes can spread certain viruses, such as West Nile and Zika.

Here are some simple recommendations that can help lower the risk of getting bug bites:

  • Avoid areas that bugs enjoy - For example: large gardens, areas with uncovered sitting food, and areas with standing water.

  • Limit the amount of standing water (ponds, buckets, birdbaths) in your own yard.

  • Avoid wearing scented lotions, perfumes, and hair products when you're outside.

  • If possible, wear long sleeves and pants when outside in the evening.

The American Academy of Pediatrics  also recommends the use of insect repellents containing DEET for children over the age of 2 months, when needed, to avoid exposure to insect related diseases.

  • Do not use repellent containing DEET on children younger than 2 months of age.

  • Read the label of a repellent before purchasing or using it. Different products contain different amounts of DEET. The American Academy of Pediatrics currently recommends products that contain between 10% and 30% DEET to be applied as directed on the package.

  • The amount of DEET varies in each product. Usually 10% DEET lasts for 2 hours, while 30% DEET lasts for 5-6 hours. Choose the lowest amount of DEET that will provide you the lasting coverage that you need.

  • Wash your child's skin once they come indoors.

  • Products that have bug repellent and sunscreen combined are not recommended. You will most likely need to reapply sunscreen more frequently than you can apply DEET to your child's skin.

  • Remember, bug repellents do not repel stinging insects, such as bees. If your child has a severe allergy to stinging insects, always carry your Epi-Pen.

Most bug bites are harmless. However, you should seek medical attention if:

  • your child develops a fever, rash, joint pain or headaches within 2 weeks of a bite

  • your child has bug bites that look infected (redness, swelling, drainage from the skin)

  • your child develops an immediate rash or reaction to bug repellent.

Let's help our kids enjoy summer without dealing with pesky bug bites!
By Amherst Pediatrics
February 28, 2017
Tags: Food Allergies   Allergies  

Food AllergyEspecially during the younger years, adequate food and nutrition is vital for a child’s growth and development. But for some children, a snack or meal as simple as a peanut butter sandwich or a cup of milk can cause serious health problems. So, what’s a parent to do when they suspect their child is allergic to a certain food?

A food allergy is the abnormal response of the immune system to a food. It’s possible to be allergic to any food, but these particular foods are responsible for the majority of allergies: milk, eggs, wheat, soy, tree nuts, fish, shellfish, and peanuts. Food allergies should not be confused with food intolerance, or food sensitivity, which is more common and less severe.

Symptoms of an allergic reaction typically occur within just moments to an hour after the child ingests a food. They can range from uncomfortable to life-threatening, so it’s important for parents to understand what to do if they suspect their child is having an allergic reaction to food. Symptoms will vary for each child, but the most common telltale signs include:

  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Hives
  • Eczema
  • Trouble breathing
  • Itching or swelling of the lips, tongue, mouth or throat
  • Sneezing
  • Wheezing
  • Light-headedness or loss of consciousness

Food allergy symptoms often resemble other medical conditions, so always contact your pediatrician for a proper diagnosis. If you suspect your child has a food allergy, remove that particular food from your child’s diet immediately. If the allergic reaction is severe, seek medical care right away.

The good news is that food allergies are often outgrown during early childhood. Your pediatrician or allergist can perform tests to pinpoint and track your child's food allergies They can also work with you to modify and manage your child’s diet to ensure they are receiving adequate nutrition for growth and development without putting them at risk for additional allergic reactions.



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Monday:8:00 AM - 6:45 PM
Tuesday:8:00 AM - 6:45 PM
Wednesday:8:00 AM - 6:45 PM
Thursday:8:00 AM - 6:45 PM
Friday:8:00 AM - 4:45 PM
Saturday:12:30 PM - 3:45 PM
Sunday:12:30 PM - 3:45 PM

Contact Us

Our Address
31 Hall Dr.
Amherst, MA 01002
Tel: (413) 253-3773
Fax: (413) 256-0215
Email: mail@amherstpeds.com

Routine Visits
We see patients in our office for routine visits Monday through Friday from 8:30 am to 4:45 pm.

Urgent Visits
Urgent visits are scheduled throughout our normal weekday business hours.

We also have special urgent-care-only hours as follows:

  • Monday through Thursday 5:00pm to 6:45pm
  • Saturdays & Sundays from 12:00pm to 3:45pm

For urgent visits, we ask that you please call ahead.

* Please note: It is our policy that we do not approve referral requests for visits to outside urgent care centers during times that our office is open.

Holidays
We are open for urgent visits only on most Holidays. Our office is closed on Easter Sunday, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day.